Last edited by Arashisar
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice, 1980-81 found in the catalog.

Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice, 1980-81

Annie Lou Bell

Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice, 1980-81

by Annie Lou Bell

  • 315 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Earth Satellite Service in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ice -- Great Lakes (North America),
  • Artificial satellites -- Optical observations

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAnnie Lou Bell
    SeriesNOAA technical memorandum NESS -- 119
    ContributionsUnited States. National Earth Satellite Service
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 36 p. :
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14851102M

      Melting of glaciers has an equal effect, but in this case it is not known which part is anthropogenic as studies of polar regions attribute mass loss mostly to ice dynamics. The above observations strengthen an earlier (Koutsoyian- nis et al., ) envisagement of the hydrological community’s role. [] The Walsh data set contains no information on ice concentration on the Laurentian Great Lakes. The monthly Great Lakes data for –79 collected by Assel (see section ) were used to define a calendar monthly climatology, which was used in all fields prior to The Assel monthly varying Great Lakes data were used for –

    The documentation, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) Great Lakes Surface Ice Reports, , is reproduced below (in Detailed Data Description) in slightly edited form. Teletype ice reports and weekly ice observation logs, from / irregularly through /, are available on microfilm as follows (note gaps in. This is achieved by providing Internet access to near real-time and retrospective satellite observations, derived products, modeled, and in-situ Great Lakes data. The goals and objectives of the CoastWatch Great Lakes Program directly support NOAA's statutory responsibilities in estuarine and marine science living marine resource protection.

    "Mortimer chronicles three centuries of inquiry into Lake Michigan from the Native Americans, who called it Michigani (Great Waters), to the French explorers, whose first recorded observations date from the s, to present-day scientists, who use satellite views of the Great Lakes from outer space." "Lake Michigan in Motion is a source of information for amateur naturalists, students. Water Temp: Map of Great Lakes Surface Water temperature; color-coded map shows water temperature (or ice as applicable) in the Great Lakes; National Oceanic and Atomospheric Administration Buoys: Western Great Lakes Recent Marine Data; get readings from marine buoys about water and weather conditions through a clickable, graphical map of.


Share this book
You might also like
Jyothi Basu, visionary antiquities, November 18-December 9, 2006

Jyothi Basu, visionary antiquities, November 18-December 9, 2006

Outlines of rhetoric

Outlines of rhetoric

Restitution

Restitution

The MIT dictionary of economics

The MIT dictionary of economics

Violence in northern Ireland

Violence in northern Ireland

concise German etymological dictionary

concise German etymological dictionary

Open skies aerial photography of selected areas in Central America affected by Hurricane Mitch

Open skies aerial photography of selected areas in Central America affected by Hurricane Mitch

Interstate Character of Convict-Made Goods

Interstate Character of Convict-Made Goods

A God Who Looks Like Me

A God Who Looks Like Me

The DIY bride crafty countdown

The DIY bride crafty countdown

living Wesley

living Wesley

Unemployment insurance and work effort

Unemployment insurance and work effort

In vitro responses of soft water algae to fertilization

In vitro responses of soft water algae to fertilization

Resource & information leaflets.

Resource & information leaflets.

Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice, 1980-81 by Annie Lou Bell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice: [Annie Lou Bell; United States. National Earth Satellite Service.]. Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice--winter Washington D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Earth Satellite Service, [] (OCoLC) Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice, [microform] / By Annie Lou.

Bell, United States. National Earth Satellite Service. and United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Abstract. of access: Internet. [On March 6,Great Lakes ice cover was %, putting winter into 2nd place in the record books for maximum ice cover.

Satellite photo credit: NOAA Great Lakes CoastWatch and NASA.] [NOAA by Gabrielle Farina] As many of us in the Great Lakes community start to don our parkas and break out the snow shovels again, we know the splashing. We present the first full observational Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice atlas for the Great Lakes.

• We describe a method to integrate SAR and QuikSCAT wind speeds. • We describe a method to integrate satellite and in situ wind observations.

• We present methods for correction of wind speeds for the ice season. • Wind prediction errors are reduced by integrating Cited by: Lake ice cover is a sensitive indicator of regional climate and climate change (Hanson et al., ; Wang et al., ). There has been a significant downward trend in lake ice cover over the Great Lakes, with Lake Erie experiencing 50% less ice extent over the – period (Wang et al., ).

With bloom conditions on Lake Erie. C-band polarimetric backscatter observations of Great Lakes ice Abstract: Two experiments were carried out during the winter season across the Straits of Mackinac and Lake Superior. C-band radar backscatter signatures of various ice types and open water were measured from U.S.

Coast Guard Ice Breaker vessels together with ground truth data. The same happens in the Great Lakes, although the largest tides in the Great Lakes are only about 5 cm and are mostly impacted by precipitation, evaporation and runoff. CO-OPS maintains the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON), an observation network with more than permanent water level stations on the coasts and Great Lakes.

In recent years, warmer surface water temperatures in the Great Lakes have contributed to lower water levels by increasing rates of evaporation and causing lake ice to form later than usual (see the Lake Ice indicator), which extends the season for evaporation. 1 Lower water levels in the Great Lakes forced ships to reduce their cargo tonnage.

Michael Notaro's 96 research works with 2, citations and 9, reads, including: Quantifying the drivers and predictability of seasonal changes in African fire. Satellite data also has the potential to provide fairly frequent observations both temporally and spatially, although wintertime data are still limited due to snow and ice cover.

Estimates of cyanobacteria concentration from satellite data offer a cost-effective approach to fill in temporal and spatial gaps when field sampling is not feasible.

Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice: winter Published Date: Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice: Personal Author: Bell, Annie Lou Lake evaporation for the Laurentian Great Lakes is of the same order of magnitude as precipitation and runoff to the lakes and its estimation is important for simulations.

Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice: Personal Author: Bell, Annie Lou Corporate Authors: United States, National Earth Satellite Service. Published Date: Satellite observation of Great Lakes ice: winter Personal Author: Wartha-Clark, Jenifer.

Remote sensing of Great Lakes ice cover uses various classes of radars including scatterometer, polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), and interferometric SAR.

Satellite wide-swath scatterometers provide large areal coverage with high temporal resolution data to map Great Lakes ice. Bell, A.L., Satellite observations of Great Lakes ice,NOAA, National Earth Satellite Service reportBoisvert, J.B., T.J.

Pultz, R.J. Brown, and B. Brisco, Potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar for large-scale soil moisture monitoring: A Review, Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, v, n.1,March   Of course we’re still below the baseline.

The dedicated satellite observations started when Arctic sea ice was at or near its high for the century, ie So of course the baseline is higher than now.

But Arctic sea ice fluctuates naturally in about a year cycle. This animation shows the snow cover over North America during the winter as well as the ice concentration over the Great Lakes.

The date and a graph showing the percent of ice cover over the Great Lakes and Lake Superior is shown on this version. Arctic warming signals from satellite observations, Weather, 61(3)–76, doi The age of the oldest glacier ice in Antarctica may approach 1, years old The age of the oldest glacier ice in Greenland is more thanyears old The age of the oldest Alaskan glacier ice ever recovered (from a basin between Mt.

Bona and Mt. Churchill) is ab years old. Glacier flow moves newly formed ice through the entire. This chapter provides an overview of the NASA Early Adopter Program from the perspective of three new and planned satellite earth observing missions—SMAP, ICESat-2 and SWOT.

The level of activity and. Our ASIP is staffed 7 days a week from am to pm Operations Phone Line: Operations Email: @. This data set contains daily visual ice observations taken yearly from 1 November to 30 April at NOAA/National Ocean Service water level gauge sites in the Great Lakes Basin from to the Not all gauge sites have reported each season; a list of sites with coordinates and reporting years is included with the data set.

Through both in situ and satellite observations, it is well known that ice breakup on Great Slave Lake typically precedes that on Great Bear Lake by about one month. Because of a relatively late ice breakup in Great Bear Lake inGreat Slave Lake gained more solar flux to warm the upper water levels than Great Bear Lake.These employ the following surface boundary conditions: 1) all lakes are assumed to be completely ice covered (ALLICE) by setting initial skin temperatures over lakes to K (the average NARR skin temperature for all ice covered lake points), 2) all lakes are assumed to be ice free (NOICE) by setting any lake point temperatures below